Celestite or celestine a sulphate mineral

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Description

Celestite or celestine is named for its occasional delicate blue color. Celestine is the principal source of the element strontium, commonly used in fireworks and in various metal alloys.

Mineral Group  sulphate
Composition  SrSO4
dimension (cm)  4x3x2
weight (g)  37
Celestite, sometimes called celestine, has long been familiar to Bengali priests who used it to colour flames. With its help they prepared the vividly crimson Bengali lights, whose mysterious beauty filled believers with awe and horror. Not till much later did chemists discover that this flame colouring was caused by the element strontium, a component of celestite, while its relative, barium, colours the flame green-yellow. Chemists obtained volatile salts of both these metals from certain minerals, and mixed them with potassium chloride, charcoal and sulphur to make firework rockets.
The name celestite comes from the Latin caelestis (`heavenly’), after its sky-blue colour. Its crystals usually have the form of thick orthorhombic plates and columns. It is commonly found in sediments which developed from the skeletons of some radiolaria, in hydrothermal veins and cavities of igneous rocks. In Sicily and at Tarnobrzeg in Poland it occurs in crystal form. Industrially valuable deposits are near Bristol in the UK, at Mokatam in Egypt and at Lake Erie in the USA. Celestite is used in the chemical and food industries and for surgical and pyrotechnical purposes.
Celestine or celestite (SrSO4) is a mineral consisting of strontium sulphate. The mineral is named for its occasional delicate blue color. Celestine is the principal source of the element strontium, commonly used in fireworks and in various metal alloys.
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Additional information

Weight 37 g
Dimensions 4 x 3 x 2 cm